5 Vital Questions To Ask When Looking At Used Vehicles

Posted on Jul 8 2015 - 7:03am by Desk of Editor

Everyone knows that it is easy to get a bad deal when buying a used car. That is especially the case if you avoid reputable dealers and purchase from the private market. To give you a helping hand and ensure you don’t get ripped off, we’ve come up with five vital questions you must ask. Failing to do so could mean you don’t learn enough about the vehicle before handing over your hard-earned cash. When that happens with private sellers, you will struggle to get a refund. As the saying goes, most of those cars are sold as seen.

Nissan Tiida

 

  • Does the car have a full service history?

Models that come with a full service history tend to be in better condition. That is because they have been assessed and fixed by registered mechanics at regular intervals. If there have been any significant issues, all the information should be available.

  • How many miles are on the clock?

Asking about mileage is something you should do before going to view any cars. If you are looking at a model that is less than five years old and it has done more than 120,000 miles, you should probably move onto something different. The last thing you need is a vehicle that has seen better days.

  • Is the price negotiable?

When it comes to the price, it’s sensible to ask if the seller is willing to negotiate. That can be difficult for some people who have not haggled over something so expensive in the past. However, there are lots of articles available online that offer great advice. Just read through some of them and pick up on some tips before your viewing.

  • Is the logbook in order?

It is a legal requirement that all cars sold in the UK come with a logbook. If the seller fails to provide you with that item, handing over your cash is a bad move. They might want to hide it from you for a few different reasons. If the car has been stolen or altered in an illegal manner, you could lose out big time. So, refuse to deal with sellers who do not provide the logbook on your first request.

  • Will the seller accept returns?

As we said only a moment ago, most private sellers will not offer a refund if you aren’t happy with the vehicle. However, the same isn’t always true with used dealerships. After buying a transit van from Sandles Car Supermarket last year, one of our team successfully managed to get his money back. That was because he discovered the model he purchased wasn’t large enough. The company offered him a full refund and helped him to find something more suitable. So, it’s not all bad. You just need to locate the most reputable and reasonable sellers.

So long as you ask those five crucial questions when buying your next used vehicle, the scales of balance should tip in your favour. At the end of the day, you could end up paying £5,000 or more for an average second-hand car. So, you don’t want to make the wrong decision.

Thanks for visiting us today. We hope you are now feeling a little more confident.